COMPLIANCE OF PUBLIC JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ON CHILD PROTECTION POLICY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION A Basic Education Research Presented to the Department of Education – Batangas Province Researchers Banaag

March 15, 2019 Critical Thinking

COMPLIANCE OF PUBLIC JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ON CHILD PROTECTION POLICY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

A Basic Education Research
Presented to the
Department of Education – Batangas Province

Researchers
Banaag, Norman Bryan Dimaano
Dr. Javier, Maxima Magbuhat
Reyes, Noralyn Reyes

July 2018

This study assessed the compliance of public junior high schools’ in Ibaan District on Child Protection Policy of the Department of Education. Specifically it determined the profile of the respondents in terms of age, sex, civil status, and designation. Also, assessment on the compliance of junior high schools’ on the requirements of the Department of Education on the Child Protection Policy was done along with the responsibilities of each of the aforementioned schools’ on Child Protection Policy. Further, differences on their assessments according to their age were also taken into consideration. Results of these were used as basis on the proposed course of action to ensure the strict implementation of each schools on the Child Protection Policy of the DepEd.
The researchers used the descriptive design using the quantitative technique. One hundred eleven respondents which included the teachers, Master Teachers, and Head Teachers of concerned Public Junior High Schools participated in the survey. Frequency, percentage, weighted mean, ranking, and independent t-test were used to statistically treat the data which exposed the following;
Most of the respondents belong to the age bracket of 30-39 and majority was female, married, and belonged to the teaching force. It was found out that the junior high schools’ are compliant on requirements of the Department of Education on the Child Protection Policy and the aforementioned schools’ responsibility over the matter is very evident. Moreover, no significant differences were found on the respondents’ assessment on the schools’ compliance and responsibilities on the implementation of Child Protection Policy. Hence, action plan to ensure strict implementation of the aforementioned policy was designed.

Keywords:
Child Protection Policy, Compliance of Public Junior High Schools’, Responsibilities of Public Junior High Schools’

III.Acknowledgement
The researchers wish to acknowledge with deep gratitude and sincere appreciation the following individuals who have graciously extended their invaluable assistance and unwavering support.
Mr. David Nuay for his Encouragement
Dr. Emiliana Roxas, Public School District Supervisor of Ibaan for her support and permission to conduct the study in the District of Ibaan.
Dr. Nenita Adame, Principal II of Dr. Juan A. Pastor Memorial National High School for the permission to distribute the questionnaires to the teachers.
Dr. Imelda Flores of Batangas State University for her expertise in the statistical matters of the study.
Mrs. Myrna De Castro for her patience in checking the organization and contents
of this research.
To the District and Division Research Committee
Mrs. Mary Ann Alvarez for helping us in the retrieving of questionnaires.
Teachers, Master Teachers, Head Teachers of the two Junior High Schools in Ibaan who gave their time and attention in answering the research questionnaires.
To the students, faculty and staff of Maximo T. Hernandez Memorial National High school headed by Dr. Maxima M. Javier for encouragement and support.
To our familes who bestowed love and understanding
Above all, the Almighty and ever loving GOD, who is the source of all wisdom and goodness and by whose providence of this work was made possible.
-Norman B., Dr. Maxima J., and Noralyn R.

IV. Introduction of the research
For the past several years, Philippine basic education has been undergoing series of changes, modifications and improvement in different areas especially on children’s protections and welfare. The Department of Education (DepEd) initiates changes within the educational system to adopt the Philippine education to the needs and demands of globalization.
One of the duties of DepEd as stipulated in the guidelines is to develop information, education, reporting system, exercise of disciplinary action and recommendation to address and prevent all forms of child abuse and to develop a Child protection policy.
Former Education Secretary Armin Luistro signed the Child Protection Policy and stated that it would be a very useful tool for teachers as they struggle daily with the duty of instilling discipline among their young and impressionable school children. It was developed by the DepEd in partnership with groups of civil society , teachers, private and public school representatives, international agencies and other child protection advocates. It was formally titled “Policies and Guidelines on Protecting Children in School from Abuse, Violence, Exploitation, Discrimination, Bullying and Other Forms of Abuse.”
In article I, Section no.2 Paragraph 3 of the Republic Act 7610 otherwise known as the Act of Providing for Stronger Deterrence and Special Protection Against Child Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination, and for Other Purposes states that the best interests of children shall be the paramount consideration in all actions concerning them, whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative authorities, and legislative bodies, consistent with the principle of First Call for Children as enunciated in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. Every effort shall be exerted to promote the welfare of children and enhance their opportunities for a useful and happy life.
In 1987 Constitution Art. XV section 3 stated that the State shall defend: The right of children to assistance, including proper care and nutrition, and special protection from all forms of neglect, abuse, cruelty, exploitation, and other conditions prejudicial to their development.
Child protection is a global requirements; confronting every country in the world. Children are exposed to the threat of violence in all spheres of life; at home, in school and the community, the workplace and in institutions. In all of these settings children are exposed to various forms of violence, including physical, emotional and sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as neglect. New/emerging forms of violence include online exploitation, where easy access to internet and the hidden nature of crimes committed in cyberspace leave children particularly vulnerable.
In the National Baseline Study on Violence against Children: Philippines by UNICEF ( 2016) stated that The Philippine’s commitment in 2010 to undertake its own national study – the first country in the region to begin this process – follows the country’s recognition as an active regional leader in the VAC movement. In general, recently enacted laws and policies in the Philippines have been crafted to better protect children, and adhere to international standards, and are thus held up as positive examples for the region. However, in spite of these laws, a dearth of national data and a lack of reporting mechanisms have rendered many less effective than intended. Consequently, initiatives taken by national institutions and international organizations are often insufficient, and at times even irrelevant and inappropriate. Additionally, prosecutions and convictions of those who perpetrate VAC have remained disproportionately low, with little change over the years.
The Child Protection Policy (DepEd Order No. 40, s. 2012) issued by the DepEd in 2012 refers to programs, services, procedures, and structures that are intended to prevent and respond to abuse, neglect, exploitation, discrimination and violence.
The Department reminded that under Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act (RA 7610) and CPP, teachers who humiliate students will face administrative sanctions. DepEd continues to equip teachers and school heads with knowledge on child protection policies of the government through a series of forums and consultations.
From the above foregoing, the researcher was challenged to venture in assessing the status of public junior high school in Ibaan District in compliance to the implementation of Child Protection Policy of the Department of Education. At the end, the policy is worth applying for, since it’s a measure that could benefit a lot the students and could bolster school’s quality services to the clientele.
V. Literature Review
The Child Protection
It is the responsibility of every individual in the society to protect children and provide them with an environment that caters to their healthy development. There are many types of maltreatment that fall under the wider categories of abuse, neglect, violence and exploitation. Children need to be protected against all sorts of physical, mental, sexual abuse and/or violence, neglect, and exploitation while in the care of a caregiver, including parents or legal guardians.
Over the past few decades, effort has been made by different stakeholders to protect children around the world. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) was passed in 1989 whereby rights pertaining to survival, protection, development, participation of the child were established and agreed upon.
The CRC provides a framework for countries to reformulate laws affecting children in several countries. Almost all UN member countries except Somalia, Sudan and the United States of America have signed this convention. According to the UN CRC (1989), all children have the right/must to be protected from all forms of abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence. Article 19 of the convention states that it is an individual state’s duty to take all possible protective measures: enforce policies, implement laws, as well as establish appropriate systems and institutions to ensure the safety of all children under her care.
Although the UN CRC 1989 provides a framework for child protection and development, the cultural norms, traditional practices and social acceptance /tolerance vary across the globe. Therefore, it is important to look at child protection from a more culturally sensitive point of view. This is to say that the cultural norms and traditional practices of child rearing in a region should be given due significance while developing policies and laws in a specific country. Country and cultural- based studies are also needed to look at factors that can precipitate child maltreatment (WHO, 1999).
(UNICEF, 2016) According to the National Baseline on Violence Against Children Violence is a global problem; confronting every country in the world. Children are exposed to the threat of violence in all spheres of life; at home, in school and the community,the workplace and in institutions. In all of these settings children are exposed to various forms of violence, including physical, emotional and sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as neglect. New/emerging forms of violence include online exploitation, where easy access to internet and the hidden nature of crime committed in cyberspace leave children particularly vulnerable. The physical and emotional harm to children resulting from the experience of violence is devastating.
( DOJ,2016) On 17 June 1992, the Philippine Congress enacted Republic Act No. 7610, “An Act Providing Stronger Deterrence and Special Protection Against Child Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination”, as a concrete expression of its compliance to the provisions, principles and standards of the CRC. In 2002, the Philippines also ratified the two Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on (a) the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography and (b) the involvement of children in armed conflict. To monitor the enforcement of RA 7610, the Special Committee for the Protection of Children (SCPC) was created in 1995 through Executive Order No. 275. Headed by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD Recognizing the vulnerability of children as well as their key role in the future of the nation., the 1987 Philippine Constitution included the following provision: “The state recognizes the vital role of the youth in nation building and shall promote and protect their physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual and social wellbeing” (Article 11, Section 13 This state policy recognizing children’s right to special protection had been translated into several legislative enactments such as “The Child and Youth Welfare Code” or Presidential Decree No.603 as amended, RA 7610 as mentioned above, and RA 7658 or “An Act Prohibiting the Employment of Children Below 15 Years of Age”, among others. These pieces of legislation provide protection for Filipino children from various forms of abuse, violence and exploitation.
The Philippine Government has developed a “National Strategic Framework for Plan Development for Children”. Popularly known as Child 21 and spanning 25 years up to 2025, its goal is to build a “childst sensitive and child-friendly society” as the country’s promise to Filipino children in the 21 century. It is meant to “serve as a road map, a guide to make plans and programs for children more focused”.Child 21 also places strong emphasis on the rights and unique needs and circumstances of disadvantaged and vulnerable children and provides a sharper focus on the rights of all children tospecial protection. The vision of Child 21 has been concretized through the formulation of the National Plan of Action for Children (NPAC) for the period 2005-2010. NPAC translates the vision of Child 21 into “clear, actionable and time-bound plan within a shorter, five-year time frame”. It is in the context of NPAC as well as the global policy directions articulated in the “World Fit for Children” and the Millennium Development Goals that the Comprehensive Programme on Child Protection (CPCP) has been revised and updated. As such, the CPCP is a companion document to NPAC and is an elaboration of the NPAC child protection component.

According to Velayo on his research about A perspective on Child Abuse in the Philippines ( Looking at institutional Factors) said that the Philippines is similar to many other Asian countries in the way Western culture has greatly influenced its development and way of life. The Philippines’ historical roots began with Spanish colonization four centuries ago. This colonization contributed to the development of a culture in which the church and the school usually emerge as the most influential institutions influencing the way children are brought up. Cases of physical and sexual abuse, as well as those considered “abuses of neglect,” continue to be of major societal concern. Thus, violence in schools as well as other institutional sectors of society that play a role in a child’s development is a problem of global proportions faced by most developed and developing countries.
On the Child Protection and Maltreatment in the Philippines: A Systematic Review of the Literature said that range of government agencies and mechanisms provide national policy and program responses to child maltreatment in the Philippines. These include; the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), the Council for the Welfare of Children (CWC) and the Committee for the Special Protection of Children (CSPC) based at the Department of Justice, and Barangay Community Councils. The DSWD is the primary welfare agency of the government. Its role is to set standards, accredit and provide consultative services to public and private institutions, organisations and persons engaged in social welfare activities, as well as monitor the performance of these bodies and enforce compliance to standards (Save the Children 2011). The DSWD provides and regulates residential care, domestic and inter?country adoption and a range of family based welfare program (PSA and UNICEF 2015). Another government agency, the Council for the Welfare of Children is the principal agency for children’s issues and policy in the Philippines, tasked with designing, coordinating and monitoring policy for children, as well as monitoring children’s rights in the Philippines (Bessell 2009; CWC 2011).
The criminal justice system’s efforts to protect children is supported by the Department of Justice’s Committee for the Special Protection of Children which provides legal protection of children and monitors and coordinate the investigation and prosecution of cases of child abuse detailed in the Republic Act 7610 entitled ‘An Act Providing For Stronger Deterence and Special Protection Against Child Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination, Providing Penalties for its Violation and For Other Purposes’, signed into law in 1992 (Save the Children 2011). This committee works to support this legislation and apply laws and policies that are designed to protect children. Additionally, the Barangay Councils for the Protection of Children (BCPC) operate across the local government level and offer an initial response to issues of child protection in local communities, assisting abandoned, maltreated and abused children (Save the Children 2011; ECPAT, 2006).
The primary government and non?government programmatic response for victims of child abandonment, neglect and abuse is through residential (institutional care provided in a non?family group setting) care (Save the Children 2011). The most recent information provided by the DSWD reveals 915 private social welfare agencies licensed by the DSWD, and of those, 177 operating 197 residential care facilities for children and young people (DSWD 2016). The DSWD directly operates 46 residential care facilities for children who are victims of child maltreatment, experiencing homelessness or mental illness. These residential care facilities vary in capacity, from four to 490 children The latest published DSWD annual report details 5819 children in the residential care facilities run directly by DSWD, however provides limited detail of the numbers norarrangements of children in the 197 DSWD licensed residential care facilities (DSWD 2015).
Child Protection Policies
There is limited analysis of child protection policies across the literature reviewed, and there is no comprehensive outline of child protection policies or systems in the Philippines. However, Madrid et al. (2013) provide insights into child maltreatment prevention practices and identify a range of shortfalls, including, limited funding and trained personnel and a clear absence of primary prevention programs. Further, despite laws related to children’s protection and rights, they remain largely unfunded (Madrid et al. 2013).
Terol (2009) provides a brief critique of the way in which the health sector in the Philippines responds to child protection issues via multidisciplinary Child Protection Units (CPUs). Governed by the Department of Health there are 39 CPUs across the Philippines, while the The National Bureau of Investigation and the Philippine National Police have centres for medico?legal evaluation for cases of child sexual abuse (Terol 2009). However, CPUs typically operate in isolation in addressing cases of child sexual abuse (Terol 2009). Ramiro et al. (2010) argue that national laws and child protection policies should be better monitored and reviewed to ensure implementation at a local level.
Ramiro et al. (2010) suggest that early prevention of child maltreatment could occur through screening for domestic violence and child maltreatment by health professionals. They also propose that communities could be supported via home visits of health workers and social workers, as well as community support groups and media messaging.
Mandal and Hindin (2015) recommend that child maltreatment interventions should focus on the whole of family to reduce intergenerational transmission of family violence. Terol (2009) suggests that protective services for women and children need to be strengthened, while Ladion (2007) advocates for spirituality as an impetus for recovery for survivors of child sexual abuse. Ramiro et al. (2010) highlight poverty reduction as a way to reduce child maltreatment. More specifically, in the criminal justice context, Sana et al. (2014) recommend a training program for workers who interact with victims of abuse to improve justice outcomes. Sugue?Castillo (2009) discusses the legal system as overloaded and having poor responses to child sexual abuse.
In Article 218, 220, 233 of the Family Code of the Philippines and PD 603 .gives the school, its administrators and teachers, or the individual, entity or institution engaged in child care the special parental authority and responsibility over the minor child while under their supervision, instruction or custody.Authority and responsibility shall apply to all authorized activities whether inside or outside the premises of the school, entity or institution.
The Deped Order No. 40, S. 2012
DepEd Order No. 40, s. 2012 or DepEd Child Protection policy constitutes the policy and guidelines on protecting children in school from abuse, violence, exploitation, discrimination, bullying, and other forms of abuse. Among its bases are the Philippine 1987 Constitution (Article XV, Section 3 2; Article XIV, Section 3 2), the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), and the Family Code of the Philippines..
It is also stated in this department order that towards this end, the Department of Education ( DepEd) in collaboration with its partners and stake holders, shall ensure that all schools are conducive to the education of children.. The best interest of the child shall be the paramount consideration in all decisions and actions involving children,whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative aurhorities and legislative bodies, consistent with the principle of First call for children as ununciated in the CRC. Teachers and learning facilitators especially in learning centers are their substitute parents, and are expected to discharge their functions and duties with this in mind. In this connection, the Family Code empowers the school, its administrators and teachers, or the individual, entity or institution engaged in child care to exercise the special parental authority and responsibility over the child, while under their supervision, instruction and custody.
DepEd has adopted the policy to provide special protection to children who are gravely threatened or endangered by circumstances which affect their normal development and over which they have no control, and to assist the concerned agencies in their rehabilitation.
This Department aims to ensure such special protection from all forms of abuse and exploitation and care as is necessary for the child’s well-being, taking into account the primary rights and duties of parents, legal guardians, or other individuals who are legally responsible and exercise custody over the child. DepEd recognizes the participatory rights of the child in the formulation and implementation of policies, and in all proceedings affecting them, whether they be victims or aggressors, either directly, or through a representative.
Accordingly, this Department reiterates a zero tolerance policy for any act of child abuse, exploitation, violence, discrimination, bullying, and other forms of abuse, and hereby promulgates this Department Order.
The above-mentioned policy statement of the DepEd regarding its “landmark” child protection policy, clearly states the objective of the Department in providing special protection and care to children within the school premises. Thus, such policy mandates every school in the country to come up with an adopted version of the said child protection policy to be implemented in the school to assure that every child in school is well-guarded and well-protected.
DepEd’s CPP (deped.gov.ph, 2014), mandates all elementary and secondary schools to create a Child Protection Committee (CPC), composed of school officials, teachers, parents, students, and community representatives. Since its establishment in 2012, 59% of the public schools in the country have created CPCs.
Though guidelines had been given as accorded in the Order, specifications on strict compliance, monitoring, and evaluation of implementation of the policies should be realized. In an instance that the school is a small one, the number of teachers is insufficient, and teachers had so many students handling, the policy is quite hard to implement and initiate. Also, clear definition and/or identification of cases or instances of child abuse should be clarified since there are some situations where scolding of teacher (at times necessary), could be deemed by students as already a form of abuse.
Also, one possible negative outcome that could appear in the implementation of this policy is that some students may abuse the protection being provided by the policy, especially the abusive ones who will intentionally use the provisions of the policy in terms of personal gains and fight back with the school officials (Pecson 2014).
On the other hand, the said policy if properly implemented and executed could assure that no form of violence, exploitation, abuse, and other related forms will no longer be happening within the school premises. Also, superb and quality learning process could be realized since students are attending classes in schools where their rights are recognized and their protection is being safeguarded.

VI. Research Questions
This study aims to determine the Compliance of Public Junior High Schools in Ibaan District on Child Protection Policy of the Department of Education .
Specifically; it seeks answers to the following questions:
1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of age, sex, civil status, and
designation.
2. What is the assessment on the compliance of Junior High Schools on the
Requirements of the Department of Education on the Child Protection Policy?
3. What are the respondents’ assessments on the responsibilities of the school head and teachers on Child Protection Policy?
4. How do the assessments of the respondents differ according to sex?
5. Based on the analysis what could be the course of action to enhance the
Implementation of Child Protection Policy?

VII. Scope and Limitations
The study covers 111 Teachers of Junior High Schools in Ibaan District. The Scope are child protection, policy on child protection. This paper is limited to the responses of teachers and heads. Students who are the direct beneficiaries of this study can also be considered as respondents..
VIII. Research Methodology
a. Sampling
This study which aimed to determine the compliance of Public Junior High School in Ibaan District, used random sampling to identify the respondents. Using the sample size calculator of raosoft application 111 respondents out of 154 population from Dr. Juan A. Pastor Memorial National High School and Maximo T. Hernandez Memorial National High School which composed of 28 males and 83 Females with the total were surveyed.
b. Data Collection
To determine the Compliance of Public Junior High School on Child Protection Policy in Ibaan District, a survey questionnaire was used. According to (Cohen, 2013) a questionnaire is the instrument for collecting the primary data from respondents.
The questionnaire was divided by three parts namely the Profile of the respondents, the compliance to the Child Protection Policy and lastly is the responsibility of school head and teacher in the implementation of Child Protection Policy. To develop the Questionnaire the researchers used the DepEd Order No. 40, Series of 2012 as main reference in deciding the areas to be covered by the present Study.
After formulating the questionnaires the researchers presented them to the District adviser on research who made some corrections and suggestions to refine the instruments for clarity and brevity. The instruments were then subjected to face and content validity by the district supervisor hence this research was a district research. After making minor changes based on the district adviser’s suggestions the final copy was reproduced and made ready for the administration to the intended respondents. The researcher administers one by one the questionnaires to the teachers of Dr. Juan A. Pastor Memorial National High School and Maximo T. Hernandez Memorial National High School.

c. Ethical Issue
The researcher was then asked the approval of the respondents before administering the questionnaires.
d. Data Analysis Plan
Frequency and Percentage. This was used to determine the profile of respondents in terms of age, sex, civil status, and designation.Frequency Distributions summarize the distribution of variable by reporting the number of cases contained in each category of the variable (Healy, 2010).

Weighted Mean. This was used to determine the arithmetic mean in which each value is weighted according to its importance in the overall group ( Kazmier,2004).In this study it shows the extent of Compliance of Junior High School on CPP of the Department of Education. This was also used to determine the respondents assessments on the responsibilities of the school Head and the Teachers on Child Protection Policy

Ranking. This was used to describe the positional importance of an item in relation to other items. This was employed to determine the order of increasing or decreasing magnitude of the variables presented. The largest weighted mean would be the rank one or first and the next largest frequency ranks two and so on.

Independent T test. It compares two means to see if they are significantly different from each other (Urdan,2005). This was used to determine significant difference on the respondents’ assessment when they are grouped according to sex.

IX. Discussion of the research and Recommendation
The following are the discussion about the data gathered to answer the questions posed.
1. Profile of the respondents
Table 1
Distribution of the Respondents in terms of Age

Age
( in terms of years) Frequency Percentage

20-29
30-39
40-49
50 years and above
27
52
17
15
24.3
46.8
15.3
13.5
Total 111 100%

Table 1 shows the distribution of respondents in terms of age. It can be
gleaned from the table that 24.3 percent are on 20-29 years old, followed by 30-39 years old with 46.8 percent, 40-49 years old with 15.3 percent and 13.5 percent for 50 years old and above.

Table 1.2
Distribution of the Respondents in terms of Sex

Sex Frequency Percentage

Male
Female
28
83

25.2
74.8
Total 111 100

Table 1.2 shows the frequency percentage of the respondents in terms of sex.It could be gleaned from the table that in terms of sex, out of 111 respondents, there are 28 or 25.2 percent male respondents and 83 or 74.8 percent female respondents. It shows that there are more female teachers in Junior High Schools in Ibaan District which could mean that teaching is still a female dominated profession.
Table 1.3
Distribution of the Respondents in terms of Civil Status

Civil Status Frequency Percentage

Single
Married
Widow

39
71
1
35.1
64.0
.9
Total 111 100

Table 1.3 shows the Distribution of the Respondents in terms of Civil Status which have 39 or 35.1 percent single, married respondents was 71 or 64.0 percent and 1 widow with .09 percent. Overall total of 111 respondents with 100%.

Table 1. 4
Distribution of the Respondents in terms of Designations

Current Position Frequency Percentage

Teachers I-III
Master Teachers I-IV
Head Teachers I-III

104
4
3
93.7
3.6
2.7
Total 111 100

Table 1.4 shows the distribution of the respondents in terms of designation Teachers I-III got 93.7 percent, Master Teachers respondents 3.6 percent and Head Teachers respondents was 2.7 percent.

2. Assessments of the compliance of Junior High Schools on the requirements of the Department of Education

Table 2 exhibits the respondent’s assessment on the compliance of Junior High Schools in Ibaan District on the guidelines of the Department of Education on the Child Protection Policy. It is evident that the Junior High Schools agreed that they are doing

Table 2
Respondent’s Assessment on the Compliance of Junior High Schools on the Guidelines of the Department of Education on the
Child Protection Policy

Items Weighted Mean Verbal
Interpretation Rank
1. Develop a school based policy and guidelines for the prevention of violence against children in schools and make these available.
3.50
Very Strongly Complied 1
2. Conduct school information dissemination and campaign on violence prevention programs for children.
3.41
Strongly Complied 4
3. Promote child development discipline. 3.46 Strongly
Complied 2
4. Devise programs, campaigns and activities for the Child Protection Policy.
3.25 Strongly Complied 8
5. Monitor and evaluate the implementation and enforcement of Child Protection Policy inside the school. 3.24 Strongly Complied 9
6. Give assistance to the teachers and other personnel in the dissemination and campaigns on Child Protection Policy. 3.28 Strongly Complied 7
7. Attended seminars and trainings on the conduct of Child Protection Policy. 3.19 Strongly Complied 10
8. Integration of Child Protection Policy in all subject areas. 3.33 Strongly Complied 6
9. The internal and external stakeholders are properly informed about the Child Protection Policy.
3.36 Strongly Complied 5
10. The school established Child Protection Committee. 3.45 Strongly Complied 3
Composite Mean 3.35 Strongly Complied

what have been written on the department order about Child Protection Policy which means that they are compliant on the requirements of the DepEd on the Child Protection Policy as shown by the composite mean value of 3.35 with verbal interpretation of strongly complied.
From the presented data, the following implications may be deduced: first, the strong compliance of the junior high schools on the guidelines of Child Protection Policy. It is attributed to the nature that the Department of Education Mandated all schools in the Philippines on the implementation of Child Protection Policy last 2012. Every Schools’ is a child friendly schools and they are free from all violence, Children are protected and most of all the schools always insures that safety of children. The institutions always give them the assistance they needed including proper health and nutrition.
Recognizing the vulnerability of children as well as their key role in the future of the nation, the 1987 Philippine Constitution included the following provision: “The state recognizes the vital role of the youth in nation building and shall promote and protect their physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual and social well being” (Article 11, Section 13). Likewise, Article 15, Section 3 of the Constitution states that the Government must ensure “the right of children to assistance, including proper care and nutrition, and special protection from all forms of neglect, abuse, cruelty, exploitation, and other conditions prejudicial to their development”. This state policy recognizing children’s right to special protection had been translated into several legislative enactments such as “The Child and Youth Welfare Code” or Presidential Decree No.603 as amended, RA 7610 as mentioned above, and RA 7658 or “An Act Prohibiting the Employment of Children Below 15 Years of Age”, among others. These pieces of legislation provide protection for Filipino children from various forms of abuse, violence and exploitation.
This result was validated in item 1 with the highest weighted mean of 3.50 on the requirements that all schools shall develop school based policy and guidelines for the prevention of violence against children in schools and make these available. Every school’s displayed tarpaulin in conspicuous places which manifest that the particular school exercises the child protection policy. This is to remind always the students, teachers, administrators and other concern about the child protection and prevent children in all kinds of violence.
Over the past few decades, effort has been made by different stakeholders to protect children around the world. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN CRC) was passed in 1989 whereby rights pertaining to survival, protection, development, participation of the child were established and agreed upon.

3. Respondents’ assessments on the responsibilities of the school head and teacher on child protection policy.
Table 3.1
Respondent’s Assessment on the Responsibilities of the School Head on the Child on the Child Protection Policy
Items Weighted Mean Verbal
Interpretation Rank
The School Head:
1. Ensures the institution of effective child protection policies and procedures, and monitor compliance 3.50 Very Strongly Evident 8
2. Ensure that the school adopts a child protection policy
3.57 Very Strongly Evident 3
3. Ensure that all pupils, students or learners, school personnel, parents and guardians,custodians,visitors and guests are made aware of CPP. 3.47 Strongly Evident 9
4. Organize and convene child Protection Committee for the school 3.44 Strongly Evident 10
5. Conduct Disciplinary proceedings in cases of offences committed by pupils, learners. 3.54 Very Strongly Evident 6
6. Ensure that the participatory and other rights of children are respected and upheld in all matters and procedures affecting their welfare. 3.58 Very Strongly Evident 2
7. Ensure that the school adopts a student code of conduct to be followed by every learner. 3.63 Very Strongly Evident 1
8. Coordinate with the appropriate offices and other agencies for appropriate assistance and intervention. 3.54 Very Strongly Evident 6
9. Adopt such conflict resolution mechanisms that respect the rights of indigenous peoples, provided that they uphold the rights of the Child 3.54 Very Strongly Evident 6
10. Coordinate with the Department of Social Welfare and Development on a child protection Hotline. 3.56 Very Strongly Evident 4
Composite Mean 3.54 Very Strongly Evident

Table 3.1 exhibits the respondent’s assessment on the responsibilities of school head on the child protection policyin Ibaan District . It is evident that the respondents agreed that the school heads of Junior High School in Ibaan District complied in their responsibilities on the Implementation of CPP .As shown in the composite mean value of 3.54 with verbal interpretation of very strongly evident. On this level School heads can do all the responsibilities by ensuring the full implementation of CPP.The school head ensure that the school adopts a student code of conduct to be followed by every learner with weighted mean of 3.63 interpreted as very Strongly evident.
The lowest item was on the organizing and convening child protection committee for the school which rated 3.44 or strongly evident only. This is because the schools do not have to escalate any offences made by the students.The teacher, specifically the advisers and the guidance counselor/teacher and the school head, made it a point to settle any misbehavior done or committed by the student/s at the first time of conference. Hence even there is an organize committee there is no need for the school to convene the offences that is not heavy on the CPC.
Likewise since the foundation of the school where the researchers came from, the school continues what it has started in providing quality education and promoting child welfare and ensuring that all students rights will be respected and upheld an all matters.
The school as the institution of learning through the effort of the school head organize and convene school based child protection committee in order to strengthen the policies and effectivity concerning child protection. The said child protection commitee protect students from harm by providing a caring, positive,safe and motivating environment.It is composed of school head as chairman,guidance counselor/teacher as vice-chairman, representative from the faculty, representative from students, representative from the barangay, representative from parents and also representative from government agencies such as the Department of Social Welfare and Development, and the Philippine National Police child and women protection desk.They establish a safe free environment in which children can learn and develop.
Children have a very special place in our society because of their vulnerability and their special needs for protection. We are acurately aware of what children must be protected from: for example from neglect and from abuse. However realizing a world in which every child reaches their full potential requires more than ensuring these kinds of basic protections. It requires concrete actions to ensure that we live up to our positive obligation to ensure respect for every child’s fundamental human rights.
In Article 218, 220, 233 of the Family Code of the Philippines and PD 603 .gives the school, its administrators and teachers, or the individual, entity or institution engaged in child care the special parental authority and responsibility over the minor child while under their supervision, instruction or custody. Authority and responsibility shall apply to all authorized activities whether inside or outside the premises of the school, entity or institution. Deped shall ensure that our schools are conducive to the education of children
Table 3.2
Respondent’s Assessment on the Responsibilities of the School Head on the Child on the Child Protection Policy
Items Weighted Mean Verbal
Interpretation Rank
The Teacher:
1.Exercise Special Parental authority and responsibility over the child 3.61 Very Strongly Evident 9
2.Keep children in the company and support, educate and instruct them by right precept and good example. 3.65 Very Strongly Evident 5.5
3.Give them love and affection, advice and counsel companionship and understanding. 3.90 Very Strongly Evident 1
4.Enhanced protect and preserve and maintain their physical and mental health at all times. 3.65 Very Strongly Evident 5.5
5.Furnish them with good and wholesome educational materials, supervise their activities, recreation and association with others, protect them from bad company. 3.62 Very Strongly Evident 8
6.Represent them in all matters affecting their interest. 3.59 Very Strongly Evident 10
7.Inculcate the value of respect and obedience 3.66 Very Strongly Evident 4
8.Practice Positive and non-violent discipline, as may be required under the circumstances; 3.64 Very Strongly Evident 7
9.Perform such other duties as are imposed by law upon them, as substitute parents and guardians. 3.69 Very Strongly Evident 3
10.School personnel comply with the school Child Protection Policy. 3.72 Very Strongly Evident 2
Composite mean 3.67 Very Strongly Evident

Table 3.2 shows the assessments on the responsibilities of the teachers on the child protection policy obtained a composite mean of 3.67 which means that school head’s responsibility on the child protection is very strongly evident. The teacher rated the highest with 3.90 weighted mean and interpreted as very strongly evident the item on giving the students love and affection, advice and counsel, companionship and understanding. It is the ultimate mandate of the teacher to love and understand and guide the learners not to be astray on good behavior and focus on a good future.
On the other hand the lowest rated item was on representing them all in matters affecting their interest with a weighted mean of 3.59 yet still interpreted as to a very strongly evident. This is further interpreted as teacher cannot be always with their students. No matter how they truly love and care for their students, there is still a limit as to their environment with the interest of their students.
In Article 218, 220, 233 of the Family Code of the Philippines and PD 603 .gives the school, its administrators and teachers, or the individual, entity or institution engaged in child care the special parental authority and responsibility over the minor child while under their supervision, instruction or custody. Authority and responsibility shall apply to all authorized activities whether inside or outside the premises of the school, entity or institution.
4. Respondents Assessments on Child Protection Policy when grouped according to sex

Table 4
Significant Difference on the Respondents’ Assessments on Child Protection Policy when Grouped according to Sex

Variables p-values Computed t- values Decision on Ho Verbal Interpretation

Compliance of Junior High Schools on the Child Protection Policy

Compliance to the responsibilities of School Head on the Child Protection Policy

Compliance to the responsibilities of Teachers on the Child Protection Policy
.

.288

.457

.711

1.075

.750

.373

Failed to Reject Ho

Failed to Reject Ho

Failed to Reject Ho

Not Significant

Not Significant

Not Significant

? ; .05 reject Ho
Table 4 displays the differences on the respondents’ assessment on the Child Protection Policy when grouped according to sex. It can be gleaned from the table that there is no significant differences on the respondents’ assessment on the compliance of Junior High Schools on the Child Protection Policy when grouped according to sex which was shown by the computed t-value of 1.075 and a p- value of .288 which is greater than .05 level of significance which lead to the acceptance of null hypothesis. This could mean that both male and female respondents have the same assessments that junior high schools are strongly compliant on the child protection policy. Furthermore , both male and female perform their responsibilities as to the child protection policy implementation
In their respective schools. Schools are strongly compliant to this child protection policy not just to follow the department orders but to give love and show the world the role of the teachers on giving love and care to the students under their care. Children’s views have to be treated with respect and children should be provided with opportunities to initiate ideas and activities. Adults working with children should acknowledge, respect and build on good examples of children’s participation, for instance, in their contributions to the family, school, culture and the work environment. They also need an understanding of the socio-economic, environmental and cultural context of children’s lives. Persons and organizations working for and with children should also respect children’s views with regard to participation in public events.

5. Proposed course of action to enhance the implementation of Child Protection Policy

Table 5 presents the proposed course of action.

Opportunities must be available for children to express their views on issues of real relevance to their lives and enable them to draw on their knowledge, skills and abilities. Children’s participation should build on their personal knowledge – the information and insights that children have about their own lives, their communities and the issues that affect them.

Table 5
Proposed Course of Action

KRA Proposed activity Time Frame Person Involve Expected output
1. Attend seminars and trainings on the conduct of child Protection Policy. One Day Seminar and Training about Child Protection Policy. One Day Parents and teachers as well as the school administrators. Informations and Knowledge about the strong implementation of CPP
2. Organize and convene Child Protetcion Policy Meeting of School Child protection Committee to strengthen their roles in the implementation of Child Protection Committee.
Every Month School Head
Guidance Teacher
Rep. from faculty
Rep. from the students
Rep. from the barangay
Rep. from DSWD
Rep fro, PNP womens and children protection desk. Child Protection committee

3. Guideliness to fully implement the child protection policy Forums and discussions to gather data for the toolkit School head teachers and all the members of CPC. Toolkit of information about child protection policy.

Conclusions
The following are the conclusions arrived at

1. The respondents’ are mostly 30-39 years old, majority are female, married and have designation of Teacher 1-3.
2. The assessments of the respondents revealed that they strongly complied to the requirements of the DepEd on Child Protection Policy.
3. The school Heads and teachers’ responsibilities on the implementation of Child Protection Policy is very strongly evident.
4. There is no significant difference found between the respondents’ assessments when they are grouped according to sex.
5. The proposed course of action is believed to help sustain the strong compliance of each school on the Child Protection Policy.

Recommendations

The following recommendations are given to those who will benefit the study.

1. To the students. It is recommended that they should be given a symposium to understand Child Protection Policy better.
2. To the teachers it is recommended that they be exposed to their responsibilities for the implementation of Child Protection Policy so that they will not commit any violation of it.
3. To the school administrator it is recommended that they should be vigilant of the salient points of the Child Protection Policy for them to be able to protect not only the students but the teacher as well.
4. That the proposed course of action be reviewed and be considered for implementation.
5. To the future researcher it is recommended they identify the gaps in this research to be able to replicate the study in the Future.

X. Dissemination and advocacy plans
The Following are the advocacy plan:
1. SLAC Sessions
2. Seminars
3. District Research Compendium
4. Batangas Research Compendium and ICBER
5. Plan for Publishing
XI. References
CWC. (2011). The Second National Plan of Action for Children 2011-2016 (2nd NPAC). Retrieved from http://www.cwc.gov.ph/index.php/dls/category/19-misc
Department of Social Welfare and Development. (2016). Residential and Non-Residential Facilities.
Department of Social Welfare and Development. (2015). Voices from the Islands: Annual Report 2015. Quezon City.
EH, T. (n.d.). Cases of Sexually Abused Adolescent Girls with Mental Retardation in the Philippines. Journal of Child and Adolescent , 209–227.
FT, L. (2007). Kiss of heaven: recovering from the trauma of child sexual abuse among evangelical Christians. Philippine Journal of Psychology , 58–87.
M, S.-C. (2009). Legal outcomes of sexually abused children evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit. Child Abuse and Neglect , 193–202.
Madrid BJ, Ramiro LS, Hernandez SS, Go JJ, Badilio JA. (2013). Child Maltreatment Prevention in the Philippines:A Situationer. Acta Medica Philippina 47 (1).
Mandal M, Hindin MJ. (2013). From family to friends: does witnessing interparental violence affect young adults’ relationships with friends. Journal of Adolescent Health , 187–93.
Philippines Statistics Authority (PSA) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). (2015). Child Poverty in the Philippines. Makati City.
Ramiro LS, Madrid BJ, Brown DW. (2010). Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and health-risk behaviours among adults in a developing country setting. Child Abuse and Neglect , 842–55.
Ryan, P. (2014). Analysis on Child Protection Policy. Retrieved from ryanamoletepecson.bodpot.com/2012analysisjuly2018.
S, B. Children’s Participation in Decision-making in the Philippines: Understanding the Attitudes of Policy-makers and Service Providers.
Steven, R. (2017). Child Protection in the Philippines a Systematic Review of Literatures.
UN. (1989). Convention on the Rights of the Child Article 12.
UNICEF. (2016). National Baseline Study on Violence Against Children.
World Health Organization. (2010). Philippines Country Profile. Publications of the World Health .

XII. Financial Report
The following are the summary of the financial report in making this research
Supplies and Material- 1500.00
Domestic Travel Expenses-1,500.00
Communication expenses- 350.00
Reproduction, Printing, Binding—
Food and other incurred expenses during conduct of research-1,500.00
Other Expenses related to the conduct of research-1,000.00